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Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis
Healthy volunteers
Northern Ireland
Wales
Scotland
England
Further explanation
Trial phase

There are 3 main phases of clinical trials:

  • Phase 1 is the earliest stage of research, where there is often a focus on understanding if the treatment is safe or if it causes any side effects.
  • Phase 2 still focuses on safety and side effects, but also tries to find out more about what is the best dose.
  • Phase 3 often compares the new treatment to existing treatments or lookalike medications.

As drugs or interventions move into the different phases, the number of people taking part will increase. Not all studies will make it to the later phases, especially if the intervention is not found to be safe or effective in phase 1 and 2.

Further explanation
Trial phase

There are 3 main phases of clinical trials:

  • Phase 1 is the earliest stage of research, where there is often a focus on understanding if the treatment is safe or if it causes any side effects.
  • Phase 2 still focuses on safety and side effects, but also tries to find out more about what is the best dose.
  • Phase 3 often compares the new treatment to existing treatments or lookalike medications.

As drugs or interventions move into the different phases, the number of people taking part will increase. Not all studies will make it to the later phases, especially if the intervention is not found to be safe or effective in phase 1 and 2.

Further explanation
Trial phase

There are 3 main phases of clinical trials:

  • Phase 1 is the earliest stage of research, where there is often a focus on understanding if the treatment is safe or if it causes any side effects.
  • Phase 2 still focuses on safety and side effects, but also tries to find out more about what is the best dose.
  • Phase 3 often compares the new treatment to existing treatments or lookalike medications.

As drugs or interventions move into the different phases, the number of people taking part will increase. Not all studies will make it to the later phases, especially if the intervention is not found to be safe or effective in phase 1 and 2.

Further explanation
Open-label extension

Some studies offer an extension phase of research, where people continue to receive the new drug or therapy after the initial trial has finished. The extension phase is often ‘open-label’, which means that you will know that you are receiving the active treatment .

Further explanation
Can continue on antifibrotics

Within studies, there are different requirements that someone must meet, to be able to take part. Some studies recruit people who are taking antifibrotic medications, including nintedanib or pirfenidone. However, in other studies people taking part must not be taking antifibrotic medication.

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 result/s

Are there differences in the microbiome between healthy people and people with ILD?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
1 year
participation
1 year
participation
MATINEE: A study looking at the microbiome (community of bacteria) in the gut and oral cavity of healthy people

There are trillions of microbes, such as bacteria, fungi and viruses that live naturally on our bodies and inside us. This is known as our microbiome. It is thought that people with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have a microbiome that is different to those who are healthy.

This study aims to assess the microbiome of the gut and oral cavity in healthy individuals, so that any differences between people with ILD can be found. This may help researchers to identify potential screening tests that could allow for earlier diagnosis, or potential targets for treatments.

Other research
Home-based only
England
Healthy volunteers

Can a new drug, nalbuphine, help chronic cough for people with IPF?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
12 weeks
participation
12 weeks
participation
CORAL: A clinical trial investigating a potential new drug for chronic cough in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

The CORAL study is understanding whether a drug called nalbuphine extended release (ER) could treat chronic cough in people with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). The extended release means that the drug is slowly and consistently released over a period of time.

Cough is one of the most common symptoms for people with IPF and there are currently no approved treatments to help reduce it. Doctors sometimes prescribe medicines that may slow down the scarring process or medications to reduce the inflammation in the lungs. However, patients may not experience relief from coughing.

This drug has been tested in a small group of people.

The aim of this clinical trial is to confirm if similar results are found in a larger number of people with IPF. This will help researchers to understand how the drug works and whether different doses of the study drug, nalbuphine, may help to reduce cough for people with IPF.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
England
Scotland
Northern Ireland
II
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

SENTINEL study: Can a skin flap in lung transplant identify organ rejection earlier?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
1 year
participation
1 year
participation
SENTINEL study investigating if a skin flap in lung transplant can help to detect signs of transplant rejection earlier than other methods

Some people with pulmonary fibrosis receive a lung transplant. With any transplanted organs, including the lungs, there is a risk of rejection. If this occurs and is not treated, the transplanted organ can become damaged and will stop functioning. It is difficult to know if lung transplant rejection is happening, and people who receive a transplant need frequent tests to detect this.

The SENTINEL study aims to find out if a small patch of skin transplanted at the same time as the lung, from the same donor, can help to detect signs of transplant rejection earlier. This is called a sentinel skin flap. The skin is transplanted to the lower arm and may act as a way to visually check for potential rejection, showing a red rash. Currently, for lung transplants the only way to determine rejection is by doing a biopsy of the lung. It may also help to protect the lung transplant itself from rejection damage.

Other research
Hospital visits
England
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Does a new drug, Leramistat, affect lung function for people with IPF?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
24 weeks
participation
24 weeks
participation
Can a new drug Leramistat slow lung function decline for people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis?

The aim of this study is to investigate the safety and effectiveness of a new drug Leramistat in slowing lung function decline in people living with IPF.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
II
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

How does a new drug, CHF10067, affect people with IPF?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
Up to 3 months
participation
Up to 3 months
participation
A study to investigate how a new drug, CHF10067, affects the body for people with IPF

This study is finding out how a new drug, CHF10067, might affect people with IPF. The drug is a monoclonal antibody (MAB), which recognises and finds proteins on specific cells and help the immune system. Some patients who take part will be given the study drug and some will not.

The researchers want to learn how the new drug affects the body when it is given to people with IPF.

The study will learn about any side effects of the drug and understand how people respond to it.  

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Scotland
I
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

Can Namilumab help people with pulmonary sarcoidosis?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
11 months
participation
11 months
participation
Can a new drug Namilumab help people with pulmonary sarcoidosis?

Treatments remain limited for people with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Initial treatment often involves taking corticosteroids which can help to reduce inflammation in the body. Some people are also prescribed immunosuppressant drugs. These treatments are not always effective and can lead to unwanted side effects.

The RESOLVE-Lung study is looking at a new drug, called namilumab. This drug is a human monoclonal antibody (mAB) that researchers think could help to treat the underlying cause of the disease. The study aims to find out how the body responds to the drug and if it is effective for helping people with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
Open-label extension
England
II
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Can lansoprazole slow IPF disease progression?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
1 year
participation
1 year
participation
TIPAL: Treating People With Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) With the Addition of Lansoprazole

People affected by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) currently have limited treatment options to slow the progression of disease. New research studies are needed to gain valuable knowledge about potentially better treatment options.

People with IPF often have acid reflux, which is thought to result in stomach acid potentially reaching the lungs and causing damage. The production of stomach acid can be stopped by medicines called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which can then reduce the symptoms of acid reflux.

The aim of the TIPAL study is to see if IPF progresses at a slower rate when taking PPIs.

Taking a drug
Hybrid
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
III
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

What is it like for people with pulmonary fibrosis to travel by plane?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
15-minute Survey
participation
15-minute Survey
participation
Experiences of air-travel in people living with pulmonary fibrosis

There is currently limited understanding about the experiences of air travel for people living with pulmonary fibrosis and the effect that is has. This study is an online survey about the flight experiences of people living with pulmonary fibrosis.

The study aims to learn how pulmonary fibrosis can impact air-travel, including pre-flight, during the flight and post-flight.

Survey
Online only
England
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Can antibody testing help to identify risk for vulnerability to COVID-19?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
Until Spring 2025
participation
Until Spring 2025
participation
Stratification of Clinically Vulnerable People for COVID-19 Risk Using Antibody Testing (STRAVINSKY)

Although the COVID-19 vaccination program has proven very successful for most people, clinically vulnerable people, including those with pulmonary fibrosis, remain at a higher risk of COVID-19 despite having the vaccinations.  

Antibodies form an important part of the immune response which helps the body to fight infection. There is some evidence that this response to the vaccination is important for how effective the vaccination will be. It is not clear whether this is true in all clinically vulnerable groups and there appears to be differences between individuals with the same condition. There may be other factors that play a role, including other parts of the immune system, other health conditions, particular medicines, or things like age.

This study aims to investigate which factor or combination of factors predicts an individual’s risk to COVID-19.

Other research
Hybrid
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Scotland
Wales
Northern Ireland
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

BTS Interstitial Lung Disease Registry

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
Ongoing
participation
Ongoing
participation
BTS Interstitial Lung Disease Registry

The BTS Interstitial Lung Disease Registry is a national project where data for all fibrosing ILD, including IPF and sarcoidosis is collected into an online system. Patient registries are collections of healthcare data which are for people with specific diseases or conditions.

The aim is to provide an easy system for data collection from a large number of people affected by PF to learn about the disease.

The registry collects information about clinical characteristics, the burden of disease, impact on quality of life and the disease course specific to the UK population. The longer term aims are to provide quality information to clinicians and researchers to help improve guidelines and management of disease.

Other research
Home-based only
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Scotland
Northern Ireland
Wales
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Can a new drug Belimumab help people with systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung sisease?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
1 year
participation
1 year
participation
BLISSc-ILD: Can a new drug, Belimumab, help people with systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung disease

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), also known as scleroderma, is an autoimmune disorder causing inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) that can affect different organs. Around 50% of people with SSc develop Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) or SSc-ILD.

This study will investigate whether a new drug belimumab can help reduce lung function decline and change to skin thickening and other symptoms that can impact quality of life.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
England
III
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Can reporting of new symptoms help to predict exacerbations?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
2-3 years
participation
2-3 years
participation
INGENIOUS Study: Identifying and understanding exacerbations of fibrotic lung disease

Pulmonary fibrosis changes over time. Changes are often gradual, but sometimes someone affected by pulmonary fibrosis may experience a sudden change in their symptoms known as an exacerbation or acute exacerbation.

At diagnosis, it is not known if the changes will be gradual or faster than expected. There are currently no tests that can predict exacerbations, and the cause is often unclear.

The aim of the study is to ask people to report any deterioration in their symptoms, so these can be examined further with tests. This may help to identify specific changes in blood and sputum that can predict exacerbations or identify triggers.

Other research
Hybrid
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Can a new drug Zelasudil be beneficial for people with IPF?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
12 weeks
participation
12 weeks
participation
A study investigating the effect of a new drug Zelasudil for people with IPF

The aim of the study is to learn about how the body responds to a new drug Zelasudil (RX007) and if it is effective in slowing disease progression in people living with IPF

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Scotland
Northern Ireland
II
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

ILDnose: Can eNose technology be used to diagnose fibrotic ILD?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
Up to 24 months
participation
Up to 24 months
participation
ILDnose study: a study investigating eNose technology as a diagnostic tool for pulmonary fibrosis

The diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis can be challenging. Sometimes people are misdiagnosed or wait a long time for the correct diagnosis.

A new technology called eNose may help to diagnose people living with PF. The technology involves looking at the compounds in the air breathed out by someone living with PF which has potentially useful information for diagnosis and understanding disease progression.

The ILDnose study is investigating if the new technology can be used to help with diagnosis and determine which type of pulmonary fibrosis someone has.

Other research
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

Could an antibody slow progression of systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung disease?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
50 weeks
participation
50 weeks
participation
ATHENA-SSc-ILD: Could drug PRA023 help treat systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD)

Systemic sclerosis (SSc), also known as scleroderma, is an autoimmune disorder causing inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) that can affect multiple organs. Around 50% of people with SSc develop interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

People with SSc have higher levels of molecule in the blood which promotes inflammation and fibrosis. This molecule is called tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A (TL1A).  ATHENA-SSc-ILD is a Phase 2 trial of a new drug, PRA023 for people with SSc-ILD. PRA023 binds to TL1A molecules affecting how these molecules work.

The study aims to better understand the effect of the drug on the body and investigate whether it reduces inflammation and scarring of the lungs, slowing progression of SSc-ILD.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
II
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

European IPF Registry and Biobank

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
Up to 5 years
participation
Up to 5 years
participation
eurIPFreg: European Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Registry and Biobank investigating clinical course of disease

The European IPF Registry (eurIPFreg) is one of the largest databases in Europe for the long term collection of information about people with IPF. This also includes information collected from other patient groups with different lung diseases, in order to act as comparisons.

The aim of the register is to describe and understand what happens to people with IPF over time.

Other research
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

Can Efzofitimod help reduce inflammation and lung scarring for people with pulmonary sarcoidosis?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
48 weeks
participation
48 weeks
participation
A study to investigate a new drug called Efzofitimod for people with pulmonary sarcoidosis

A new drug, called Efzofitimod, is being studied in people affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis. The drug dampens immune responses with the aim of reducing inflammation and potentially preventing lung scarring from developing.

This study aims to investigate  in a larger group of people whether the drug Efzofitimod could help reduce the progression of pulmonary sarcoidosis and what the side effects are.

Taking a drug
Hospital visits
England
III
Other forms of pulmonary fibrosis

What happens to a blood biomarker, KL-6, in people with IPF over time?

Results available
Upcoming
Recruiting
Closed
12 months
participation
12 months
participation
LOCK-IPF: Longitudinal Changes in Serum KL-6 in IPF

There are currently limited tests that can predict disease progression for people living with IPF and limited understanding of what the response to treatment will be like for each individual.

A molecule in the blood, called Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) is higher in people that have IPF, compared to those who do not have the disease. It is unclear, if blood levels of KL-6 change over time in people with IPF or in response to treatment with antifibrotics.

This study aims to monitor blood levels of KL-6 over 12 months in people who are newly diagnosed with IPF. This will help to understand whether KL-6 changes in relation to treatment with antifibrotics and/or progression of IPF.

Other research
Hospital visits
Can continue on antifibrotics
England
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)
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APF does not endorse or recommend any specific study. All responsibility for the study remains with the sponsors and investigators. You may still be able to take part if studies aren't local to you. Every effort is made to keep these details up to date. If you are aware of any inaccuracies, please email research@actionpf.org. You may also request for a study to be added.

This page is under development. We welcome your feedback! Please email research@actionpf.org.

Are you a researcher currently recruiting participants in the UK? If you would like your study included on this page, please complete this
online form.

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